House of Gucci Review – Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems

House of Gucci

Sir Ridley Scott will be 84 next week. Yet, that hasn’t stopped the prolific director from filming two vastly different flicks within the past year or so. With House of Gucci, he lets his actors do what they do best: Act. Unfortunately, there’s not much else besides the dialogue and production designs going on here, but none of it comes off as dull or dreary. Much of that is due to the surprising comedic tone of the film. As much as the trailer would lead you to believe that House of Gucci is a slick and stylish crime drama, it’s not that. As the central conflict begins to unfold, we find ourselves seeing two tonally different films at play.

House of Gucci follows Patrizia Reggiani (Lady Gaga), an outsider from humble beginnings who marries into the Gucci family. Through her husband Maurizio (Adam Driver), Patrizia’s ambition begins to destroy the family and triggers a reckless spiral of betrayal, revenge, and murder.

For audiences well-versed in the Gucci tale, Scott crafts an entertaining version of the story, with a few minor Hollywood plot adjustments to produce tension, action, and setup. As a result, the characters in the House of Gucci remain thoroughly captivating, and the cast is enjoyable to watch. 

First of all, Lady Gaga has a blast playing Patrizia Reggiani. She’s able to showcase more of her acting chops while adding an eccentric and comedic performance too. Despite only having a few lines, Jeremy Irons commands a presence. Adam Driver is extremely likable here and helps bring this complex character to life with such ease. 


As much as the trailer would lead you to believe that House of Gucci is a slick and stylish crime drama, it’s not that. As the central conflict begins to unfold, we find ourselves seeing two tonally different films at play.


The highlight of this film was definitely the Aldo and Paolo side of the Gucci family. Pacino does a great job as Aldo Gucci. He has that lovable fatherly presence that works to keep you on his side. As for Jared Leto, this is easily his best performance. Even though he’s behind all that makeup, he completely transforms into this idiotic loser. Leto steals every scene he’s in, and I wanted more from him.

As Scott injects a considerable amount of comedy into the interactions, it largely offsets the seriousness of the murder when it finally arrives. It takes a rather long time for the primary conflict to begin, and some of the characters fade into the background. This is both good and bad. To its credit, the excess of the film adds to the development of the whole Gucci gang. You learn who they are and what makes them tick. Yet, the film tends to repeatedly slow down from time to time for several unneeded scenes of dialogue.

The problem is, for all the exterior gloss and sheen, that’s all the movie has to offer. There’s nothing beyond empty surface machinations and plot building. House of Gucci looks excellent and features so many fantastic performances, but none with any emotional connection or weight. Its fashionable style carries the movie so far, and it loses value as the film progresses. Not to mention, the crime committed at the end doesn’t shock and is ultimately very hammy. Then again, so is much of this film. That’s not to say House of Gucci is not entertaining because it most certainly is. However, for a crime drama, there isn’t very much drama.

Overall, House of Gucci isn’t a flick that’s going to blaze any new trails, but the stylish production and all-star ensemble keep the film from falling apart at the seams.

Rating: 3.5/5 atoms

House of Gucci hits theaters on November 24th.

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Mark Pacis
Mark Pacis 1721 posts

Self-proclaimed "Human IMDb" and comic book geek. Biggest Iron Man fan you'll probably ever meet.

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