Pokémon Gold/Silver orchestral album ‘Johto Legends’ up for pre-order


How much do you love the soundtrack for Pokémon Gold & Silver? If your answer ranges between “I like it” to “I am nothing without its existence,” then you might be interested in the album Johto Legends, a 2xLP vinyl soundtrack featuring orchestral tracks from the game, originally composed by Junichi Masuda, Go Ichinose and Morikazu Aoki. Follow the tale of a young Pokémon Trainer trekking across the Johto Region through the remastered music from this Game Boy Color classic with music by Patti Rudisill (violin), Andrew Stern (cello), Laura Intravia (flute, piccolo), Kristin Naigus (oboe, English horn, bassoon, ethnic winds), Peter Anthony Smith (clarinet) and John Robert Matz (trumpet). Their talents range from performances such as Pokémon Symphonic Evolutions to The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses, as well as games like DestinyMinecraft, Tomb Raider, and Dragon Age. It’s safe to say that these musicians have a knack for the craft of video game music!

Available for $40 on iam8bit, the vinyls are stored in a premium foil-stamped jacket with inner sleeves. The Kanji on the front and back are are the symbols for gold and silver, designed by Ryan Brinkerhoff, and will include an an epic gatefold illustration that will be revealed at a later date. Anyone interested in pre-ordering this $40 deluxe package will be able to do so by clicking here! The album is set to come out in the first quarter of 2018, however, you’ll also receive a digital version of the soundtrack later this year so you can have a listen before you can put it on your sweet turntable.

Here is a sample of the type of music you can expect from Johto Legends.

This project would not have become a reality had it not been for various Kickstarter backers on the web. Even though the stretch goal has been met, you’re able to contribute more for some exclusive perks if you do so.

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Joey Ferris
Joey Ferris 260 posts

l love to play games and write stuff about them. I can't play something and not tell anyone how I feel about it. Call it a sickness, because it is.