A review of World War Z

world-war-z1I remember when I met Max Brooks at Comic-Con a few years back and told him how excited I was that World War Z was being turned into a movie. A few questions ‘plagued’ (see what I did there?) my mind. First and foremost, there is absolutely no way that the book could be turned into a big budget film unless it had multiple stories and was a documentary-style film. I was filled with even more glee finding out that Brad Pitt was attached to it because let’s be real, he’s an astounding actor.

From the beginning this movie was burdened with reshoots, over budgeting and delays, which made many people wonder if it was even going to come out decent. Whatever the director and Pitt decided, they sure as hell made a good decision.

World War Z

The cool thing about the screening I went to was that Brad Pitt actually showed up and introduced the movie, which made every girl and guy scream in glee. I saw the movie with a few friends and members of Nerd Reactor, who mostly didn’t really give a shit about seeing the movie. This made their opinions that much better when it came to the final result.

As IMDB describes World War Z: United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop the Zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments, and threatening to destroy humanity itself.

Yes, it is very different from the book as I said before, and if you go in expecting to watch the book turned into a movie, then I highly recommend you don’t go in with high expectations or see it at all. This film is loosely based on the book itself, but carries many of the best qualities of the book and transfers them to the big screen.

The first scene, which is essentially the trailer except much longer, was fast paced and even better! I watched the 2D version, and it’s a good thing because there may be some things you will miss if you watch the 3D version (which I hear isn’t the preferred version). One thing you will not miss is the most surprising actress in the film, the person who becomes Pitt’s sidekick, Segen (Daniella Kertesz). Even after some pretty messed up things happening to her, she still kicks ass and offers what she can.

There were many things about the film that I liked including the feeling of it seeming real, the situations and the acts. The few scenes that were funny were funny because you think, “Holy shit! That would really happen.”

I did have an issue with a few things; one being the child his family adopts. He loses his family but doesn’t shed a tear, bat an eye, or anything even resembling any sort of grievance over his lost. The second being the blatant advertising by Pepsi which actually was meant to be funny, and it surely was. I did leave the film telling one of my fellow writers, “Man, I really want a Pepsi now.” He did too for some reason. The last issue being the infamous ant hill scene, which actually worked for the film. The reason why it formed really pissed me off. If people were being loud (I won’t say how), I would tell them to shut the fuck up before zombies came and ate them. The fact that none of the security noticed it bothered me. Thankfully the action sequence after made up for it!

So far the reviews on this film are divided; some people love it and some people don’t. Rotten Tomatoes is giving it a 73% right now, which is a site I don’t trust for shit, but for some reason many people do. I guess I would just say this, the film is very fun and remember, it’s a ZOMBIE movie. How many zombie movies have been nominated for academy awards or become an actual blockbuster instead of a cult classic. The last big zombie movie was Dawn of the Dead, which itself was a pretty damn good zombie movie, but as my fellow writer who didn’t care to see it said, “I think it was the best zombie movie I have ever seen.”

Grade: A-

Sources: IMDB and Rotten Tomatoes

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Robert Galvan
Robert Galvan 392 posts

For as long as he can remember, Robert asked the questions that others wouldn't about love, life, and death which brought about his interest in the human psyche and moral compass, resulting in an infatuation with comics, zombies, and movies leading to a long standing relationship with his imagination.