Project X Zone 2 – The ultimate fanfic returns (review)

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If someone were to ask me how I would summarize the Project X Zone series, it would be, “The ultimate fanfic, mixed with a well-done combat system.” The game features more than 50 characters from a huge selection of different Bandai Namco, Capcom, Sega and Nintendo franchises.

Project X Zone 2 is pretty straightforward. It tries to create a multi-universe/dimension setting complete with time paradoxes that has an absurd yet interesting story. You’ll get to travel to locations from games like Devil May Cry, Street Fighter, .Hack//Sign and GU, DarkStalkers, Fire Emblem, and Xenoblade Chronicles. If you didn’t play the first Project X Zone, you really won’t miss out on too much as the game usually fills you in on what happened.

There are a few characters who that are not returning such as King and Frank West, and other former main characters, like Felicia and Pan-chan, are moved to a support role. While I rather enjoyed a few of the characters, I’m actually pretty happy to see that their spots were filled with some great characters. Chrom and Lucina from Fire Emblem: Awakening make an early appearance, but they don’t join your team until midway through the game. Vergil teams up with his brother Dante for some amazing combos, and normally, I’d never thought I’d see Kos-Mos from Xenosaga teaming with Fiora from Xenoblade Chronicles (both games developed by Monolith Soft).

Project X Zone 2 doesn’t feature anything really new and revolutionary; instead, it’s stuff we’ve seen time and time again (especially if you have played Super Robot Taisen OG Saga: Endless Frontier or the first Project X Zone game). The small improvements are noticeable which include slightly improved visuals and animations for characters, along with a few changes in the battle system.

One of the most notable improvement for Project X Zone 2 is how the game switches to battle phases rather than having characters and enemies go back and forth between turns. It adds a nice change of pace for the sequel, adopting the battle system used in Fire Emblem. This creates a different level of strategy, letting you plan out your movements and attacks all at once rather than waiting for your turn and hoping your enemy doesn’t get out of range. It’s especially useful after a wave of enemies enter the battle which happens quite often in the game.

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The flow of the game is similar to the first game. It has the usual text-heavy story to explain what’s going on before jumping into battle, followed by shopping or training your characters for the battles ahead. The fun thing is learning to use your attacks to juggle opponents. You can use your support attacks and team support wisely to create some damaging combos to raise your AP bar, which you can use to do a powerful super attack or defend your party members. Heck Phoenix Wright is easily the best support member to add to your strongest team, plus his animation sequence is awesome.

With a huge cast of characters introduced, not everyone gets as much time as you’d like. It doesn’t take away as the main focus is being able to create a team composed of your favorite pairings so that they can deal massive damage as you level them up. I haven’t been able to put down Project X Zone 2 since I received my copy a little over a week and a half ago, but that’s because I’m having too much fun leveling up my favorite teams. It’s like one big hit of nostalgia since there are so many characters that haven’t been in a new game for a very long time.

Project X Zone 2 rating: 4 out of 5 atoms

NR 4 Atoms - B

Project X Zone 2 
Developer: Monolith Soft, Banpresto
Publisher: Bandai Namco Entertainment
System: Nintendo 3DS
Available now

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Chris Del Castillo
Chris Del Castillo 2588 posts

Growing up Chris watched a lot of the original Saturday morning cartoons and developed a love for arts and animation. Growing up he tried his hand at animation and eventually script writing, but even more his love of video games, anime and technology grew.