What we learned from the 2015 Google Nexus Event

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Google officially announced its new line of products yesterday. Although none of it may have been too much of a surprise due to leaks, it is still good to see the official product and first-hand info from Google. Here are some of the biggest announcements that came out of the event.

The Google Nexus 6P

The Huawei-manufactured metal bodied phone is being dubbed as Google’s most premium phone. Coming in at just 7.3mm thick, the 6P will include a new fingerprint scanner, 5mp selfie camera, a 12.3mp rear camera that shoots 4K video, and will now use a USB-C port. Google stated that they understand the frustration of getting new cords, but with the new USB-C connector, the Nexus 6P will now charge faster than the iPhone 6 Plus.

The Nexus 6P is available for pre-order today in the US and UK for $499 and comes in white, aluminum, and graphite. The phones themselves will ship in late October.

The Google Nexus 5X

The 5X is the successor to the Nexus 5, which ended its lifespan earlier this year. The 5X has a few upgrades compared to its predecessor though with a 5.2in display, a slightly larger battery, and a more up to date design language. Like the 6P, the 5X will utilize a USB-C connector and will come with a fingerprint sensor on the back.

Google is marketing the Nexus 5X as the budget friendly option coming in at $379. Also like the Nexus 6p, the 5X will be available to pre-order today and will ship in late October.

Project Fi updates

Google’s wireless network, Project Fi, is finally giving users choices on the devices that they can use. At the start, Project Fi only supported the Nexus 6. Now it will support the Nexus 6P and the 5X. So you still have to have a Nexus device, which doesn’t scream “choices” to me.

Android Marshmallow gets a release date

The newest Android OS update, 6.0 Marshmallow, gets a release date of next week. Of course, just as with the previous version, the Nexus devices will be the first to get the new OS. Some of the major features coming in Marshmallow are a revamped notification system, more intuitive search function and more detailed privacy controls.

Chromecast gets an update

The little stick that lets users put virtually anything on their TV from any device has finally gotten an upgrade. The new Chromecast now supports WiFi 5.0 and as a total of three antennas, compared to the original’s one, that are optimized for WiFi streaming. The new Chromcast also has a new design in the form of a small disk and the HDMI plug in a small bendable arm allowing the device to hang away from the TV. New apps and features are also coming to the new Chromecast. Features include voice control and the new “What’s on” function that puts popular videos from services like YouTube and Netflix front and center for you to see. Some features will not be available right away, but the device itself is now available for purchase.

Chromecast Audio

Chromecast Audio is an audio focused version of Chromecast that plugs into your speakers rather than your TV that allows you to stream music from Google Play Music, Pandora, and now Spotify to your speakers wirelessly. You can control it from your phone’s locked screen or your smartwatch.

Google Play Music and Photos get updates

Google Play Music will soon be getting a new family plan that will allow up to six devices on the same plan for $14.99/mo. Photos will also get the ability to share photos with family and friends easier. Any member of the album will be able to see and share their own photos to the album.

Pixel C

Google also announced its answer to the Surface and iPad Pro, the Pixel C. This newest tablet boasts a 10.2 screen, a Nvidia X1 processor and 3GB of RAM. The tablet will run Android Marshmallow and will start at $499. Google will also offer a detachable keyboard at $149. The tablet will inductively charge the keyboard and the keyboard itself can be attached to the back of the tablet when not in use. Google says the Pixel C will be available in time for the Holidays.

Source: The Verge

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